Five Quick Links

I like to check out the blogs of people who have followed, liked or commented on mine.  Sometimes I end up following them, too, particularly if their blogs differ in theme or style from mine.

Here are some recent posts that I liked. As you can see, I appreciate photobloggers!

  • Cindy Knoke’s beautiful photos of Patagonia.  She takes beautiful wildlife photos. I asked her if she had photographed any ducks, of which there are a wide variety in Argentina.
  • Tiny House of Steel recently posted an update video of their namesake.
  • Derrick Knight has another photo-filled post, this time about Heath Robinson.
  • The writer and teacher Charles French has been featuring re-blogs of his students’ blog posts which are quite good. However, I began following him for his themed quotes posts, like this one about teaching.
  • Anthony Vicino gave a list of his top books of last year.

Freebies and Fails

I’m putting the Freebies right here for the TL/DR crowd:

  1. The SFFwaudio Podcast. I like SF and I love G.K. Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday, so I’m enjoying listening to the audio version and looking forward to hearing the podcast discussing it.
  2. Instant Pot Recipes at is giving me an overview of my intimidating birthday gift, which I haven’t used yet.

The recent three days of snow have made me grateful (yet again) for kind neighbors and profoundly covetous of their garages. I have to remind myself that I can survive another winter without one, unlike a furnace or a water heater. Continue reading

Minimal wardrobe

I thought this was an interesting article about wearing a minimalist wardrobe as a realtor work uniform. My mother knew a woman – a law clerk, as I recall – who always wore black blouses with black trousers with accessories supplying color and variety.  For those who adopt such habits, dressing becomes an absolute no-brainer.

My own wardrobe is divided in half: work clothes and play clothes. Never the twain shall meet, with the exception of informal clothes like a T-shirt under a suit jacket. A few years ago, I had casual clothes only for summer, not even a pair of jeans.

Another bullet journal idea!

After I posted about starting a bullet journal, an online pal and an old colleague sent me a link to Prevention writer Erinne Magee’s explanation of how she used bullet journaling to lose weight.

Although I’m more interested in gaining muscle and stamina, I got some ideas. I hope other readers may find it helpful, too.

Trying out the Bullet Journal

I started a Bullet Journal this week.

I’m actually a little angry that I didn’t do it before. Not angry at myself, mind you – no, I’m angry at the ladies who introduced me to the concept, complete with different colors, highlighters, stickers, etc. and apps on their Smartphones.

In other words, they complicated it when the entire point of bullet journaling is to focus on what is important. Ryder Carroll created it as a tool to combat a cluttered mind and a distracted life. Continue reading

5 Truths Your Neighbor Will Never Learn

1. Yes, you do dance around in your underwear. But the shades are blocked, so the poor neighbor will never get an eyeful.

2. That rumbling trash bin on wheels? It’s really too big for the amount of waste you generate. You just like the noise it makes at six a.m.

3. He suspects your dog crosses into his yard to poop, but he’s wrong. It was your feral child.

4. You secretly covet his vanity mailbox but haven’t the guts to swipe it and pretend you’ve had it for years.

5. As much as you wish he would move, you’re afraid the new one will be worse.


PS. I used an online phrase generator to create the clickbait title. I could use more traffic to convince publishers to send me free books for review.

P.S.S. The original title was 15, not 5. However, my neighbor is apathetic.

Yes, Emily, There Is Hypocrisy

One of my faithful readers (and oldest friends) knows that I dislike when children misuse the word “hypocrisy”. For example, a young man who was falling deeper into drugs informed me that his father couldn’t say anything to him “because he used to smoke pot”.

I eventually convinced him that someone who quit drugs was not a hypocrite. The key to enlightenment was the Beastie Boys’ Fight For Your Right with its key phrase “That hypocrite smokes two packs a day.”

But this op-ed was by a grown woman at the New Republic, of all media. Emily Atkin wrote Al Gore’s Carbon Footprint Doesn’t Matter

The key phrase is “climate change advocates who don’t live a carbon-neutral lifestyle aren’t hypocrites because, FOR THE MOST PART, they’re not asking you to live a carbon-neutral lifestyle. They’re asking governments, utilities, energy companies, and large corporations to increase their use of renewable energy so that you can continue to live your life as you please, without contributing to global warming.”
Continue reading