Street Art 2

In keeping with the spirit of my first foray – inspired by Sheree at View from the Back – I took a daytrip to Marine City, Michigan. Until recently, a ferry ran between it and Sombra, Ontario, Canada. (A recent update on the plight of the Canadian ferry service is here.) It remains a pretty riverside city that’s grown even lovelier thanks to imaginative citizens.

It’s home to the Snug Theatre and the Riverbank Theatre (a repurposed bank) and good restaurants. It’s an integral part of both The Bridge to Bay Trail and the paddlers-pleasing Blueways of St Clair. Most of its street art is on the main drag.

Local firefighters are remembered in a memorial park quite close to the sidewalk.
One of the mosaic plaques recalling the city’s maritime past. According to Great Lakes historiography, Marine City was once the largest ship-building community on the Lakes.

On the riverside, it’s impossible to separate art from landscaping. Here’s the entrance to River Park aka the Civic Women’s Club Park. The club dolled it up a little with cornstalks and gourds.

Turn into the park, and you’ll find a sitting area centered around a mature tree. The art is an accent; the river and its environs are the focal point.

The sunny benches near the water beckon.

The mural below always makes me smile – not just because it’s one of my favorite places for Sunday brunch. When the owners renovated the restaurant, they let its original mural of Peche Island Range Lighthouse play peek-a-boo with passersby.

On the inland side of the street, there’s a mix of commercial art and storefront displays.

Reflected in the window below is the Peche Island Rear Range Light, which has a rather interesting history. It’s named after Peche Island or Isle aux Pêches (French for “Fisheries Island”), which is a Canadian island located where the Detroit River meets Lake St. Clair. It always tickled me that a beat-up old lighthouse moved upriver to “land” in Marine City.

Below is art on the side of Marine City Music & Collectibles. It looks every better in person, up close.

The marque on the Mariner theater is a new addition done in the style of the ’20s. Can you tell where the new blends with the old on the building? Me, neither! If you’re wondering about the Titanic Exhibit, that’s a permanent feature. It centers on a 1:48 scale builder’s model of the RMS Titanic which the owner “brought home” after it went around the world (including London and the National Geographic Society’s Explorer’s Hall).

There is more, but I will end with two sculptures from near the Marine City Fish Company.