Don’t mind(ful) if I do: Cleaning like a Zen Buddhist monk

In my Sunday reading, I read a good article on Soji, a practice at some Zen Buddhist temples. I found it interesting that everyone must stop after 20 minutes, rather like the 15-minute sessions used for squalor-prone people overwhelmed by the thought of cleaning their homes.

If you’re wondering if I went searching for “How to live like a monk” – why no, I didn’t. As usual, I followed a link from another topic: mindfulness.

Several of my friends have gotten interested in it, including a teacher who taught squirmy elementary students ways to focus on the task at hand (especially tests).  I was even trieked talked into encouraged to join a “intuitive eating” class by Rodale Press. One of the first lessons involved Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Mindful Eating Exercise, otherwise known as the Raisin Meditation. If you’d like to try it for yourself, UC Berkeley’s Great Good in Action has the background, how to do it, and why it works.

(A list of Rodale’s 21-day Challenges is here. If anything looks interesting to you, save yourself 20% by typing MINDANDBODY as a coupon code. Rodale sent me the code after I enrolled and encouraged me to share, so help yourself!)

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3 thoughts on “Don’t mind(ful) if I do: Cleaning like a Zen Buddhist monk

  1. And here’s a little Zen proverb that was in a recent lesson:
    “When walking, walk. When eating, eat.” So the natural extension will be “When running, run.” 🙂

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